Organizational Models and Social-Collaboration Success

RSG conducted an industry survey in Q3/2014 on social-collaboration software usage, where survey respondents included a cross-section of organizations drawn from different industries. (You can get a complimentary copy of the survey results here.)  Now we're doing some follow-up analysis of the underlying data.

In a new advisory paper, we turn our attention to analyzing the experiences of large (1,000 to 10,000 employees) and very large (10,000+ employees) organizations with respect to organizational models and attendant effectiveness with social-collaboration technology.

Specifically, we look at the effects of the organizational model on application / use-case maturity, as well as the breadth of challenges enterprises face based on the model they choose. We see two broad models across enterprises

  • Traditional intranet teams are also responsible for newer, social software implementation. We call this the "Single Team Model".
  • Alternately, the social software team is distinct from the Intranet team. We term this the "Separate Teams Model"

Here's a preview of what we found:

Maturity vs. Hurdles
Figure 1: Enterprise Social-Collaboration: Impact of Organizational Model on Maturity versus Program Hurdles

The key implication is that you need to create organizational capabilities to leverage social-collaboration opportunities.

The briefing, available for immediate download for our Collaboration-Social stream subscribers, offers additional charts and in-depth commentary on how you can improve your enterprise social implementations.

If you are not a subscriber, check out your subscription options, and download a sample evaluation chapter.

Other Enterprise Collaboration & Social Software posts

Lessons from the Death of Google Search Appliance

GSA is particularly interesting because it was arguably the first major attempt to lift-and-load consumer technology into the enterprise. Let's review some of the good and bad that transpired

Workplace by Facebook Revisited

Facebook and Google talk about new revenue streams but investors still consider them advertising companies, and you should too.